Basic Start Up Bakery

26th Jan 2022 1 By Izinga Catering Equipment


Here is a basic start up bakery kit for those looking to start small and grow big

  • 1 x Single Deck Oven x 3 Tray
  • 1 x 20lt Dough Mixer
  • 1 x Single Door Prover

View Basic Start up Bakery CLICK HERE

How to Start a Bakery: The Ultimate Guide for Bakers

Are you the one that makes killer cakes for every birthday? Do you churn out to-die-for donuts? If you’re ready to turn your talents into a profitable bakery, you’ve come to the right place.

We’ve teamed up with a few amazing bakers who were willing to share their great business advice. This guide is meant to give you all the ingredients you need to plan, start, and grow a successful bakery.

To get your piece of the pie, combine these tips with your impressive baking talents and you’ll be on your way to success.

Plan your bakery

With Michelle and Barbara’s help, let’s get the planning process started.

1. Select the kind of bakery you’d like to open

One of the first decisions you’ll have to make is the kind of shop you want to open. To do this, you’ll want to assess your talents, budget, and goals. Be sure you’re not making this decision in a bubble—you will want to have your ear to the ground on national trends in the industry—remember the cupcake shop craze (and the cupcake-focused reality TV shows) a few years back? But don’t simply take your findings at face value either. It’s equally important to do local market research to figure out how national currents will affect your particular location and demographic. From there: take a look at the list below and decide which one is right for you.

  • Online. You don’t need a storefront to open a bakery. You can start out online. With a killer website, pictures of your work, and a way to place an order, you can run it from your home.
  • Counter service. With a small commercial space, customers can walk in and pick up baked goods from an employee-managed counter.
  • Specialty service. If you plan to specialise in a certain kind of baked good, a specialty service is your best option. Whether you run the business from your home or rent a space is up to you.
  • Sit down. More owners are trying to capitalise on the sit-down and dine option. It’s a growing trend in the bakery industry right now. Picture a space that has both an area to order baked goods and spot to sit and enjoy them.


View Basic Start up Bakery CLICK HERE



2. Write a business plan

Once you know what kind of bakery you want to open, you need to create a business plan. This will force you to look at the business from every angle. It will help you define your business, set goals, find ways to generate revenue, list expenses, identify your customer base, and examine your competition.

Assess your startup funds

As part of your business plan, you’ll dive into finances. One of the numbers you’ll need to generate is startup cost.You’ll need to compile a list of equipment, from appliances like ovens and refrigerators, to smaller items like utensils and pans. Make sure you create a full list of tools. The equipment will be a one-time hit, but you’ll also need money to live on while the business gets established.

You won’t make profits overnight, so you need to sit down and figure out when you’ll break even and how much money you’ll need to survive until that time.

3. Shop for space

If you’re running a bakery from your home, you’ve already got your space figured out. If you plan to invite customers into your shop, you’ll need a formal spot with a kitchen and an area for the public. Some bakers decide to rent out commercial kitchen space only. It’s a good option if you don’t want customers to walk through your shop, and just need a bigger, more equipped kitchen.

Whatever your needs, be picky. Shop around, compare prices, talk with neighbouring businesses, and research the area to make sure you find the right space. It’s never a bad idea to look into small business incubator programs that might offer space and business training or mentorship at a reduced rate. Do not forget to consider the legal necessaries—which will vary state to state—such as obtaining a licence to bake out of your own kitchen.

Roe says that following some simple guidelines laid out by the USDA lets her earn an income, develop wholesale relationships with local restaurants, independent hotels, and coffee shops, but still enjoy the benefits of being a stay at home mother. “Baking from home at times can be a challenge, Mainly in the realm of time management and little fingers wanting to try all the frosting. I am also limited on certain ingredients that I am allowed to use depending on their acidity ratio and their storability because I am not a commercial kitchen,” she says.

Wherever you decide to run your bakery, be sure to think through the pros and cons and their related costs.

See Also: How to Choose a Business Location

4. Price your baked goods

Most bakers base their retail price points on the cost of supplies and the time it takes to make the goods, but Green says this formula is flawed.

“Your prices should include things like clean up time, packaging, and time spent promoting your business on social media,” she says. “The biggest hidden cost in a bakery is time. It’s easy to forget the time you spent making flowers because you were watching TV while you did it. There is nothing worse than realising afterward that you earned 50 cents an hour on a fabulous creation.”

See Also: What You Absolutely Cannot Afford to Forget When Pricing Your Products

5. Have a defined friends and family policy

Before you sell your first scone, be aware that friends and family will probably ask for a discount.

When you’re selling cakes and cookies as a side gig, it’s fine to give the neighbour or the PTA president a discount, but when you start your business, it’s different. “All those wonderful people who previously bought cakes off of you for the cost of ingredients are going to need to be re-educated about what you’re doing now,”

Green says. “Those who really love and support you will also understand your need to feed your family and pay your rent.” If you want to offer a 10 percent discount to friends and family, that’s fine, but whatever your policy is, make sure it’s consistent.

6. Find support

Speaking of friends and family, a support system is crucial in the baking business, Batiste says. Opening a business is time-consuming. Time spent baking is only half the commitment. You’ll need to market your business, take orders, help customers, and do an array of administrative tasks.

If you don’t have someone cheering you on, it can be hard. Whether it’s your spouse, a colleague, or business mentor, you need someone in your corner. Roe says, “To say it is just me would be a lie. Though I do all the baking, my husband helps me tremendously, from delivering to running out late for some organic butter.”

Here is a basic start up bakery kit for those looking to start small and grow big

  • 1 x Single Deck Oven x 3 Tray
  • 1 x 20lt Dough Mixer
  • 1 x Single Door Prover

View Basic Start up Bakery CLICK HERE



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